Medical School

Oct 20

Scientists See Chemical Bonds Between Atoms
In an amazing work of microscopy, scientists have gotten a high-resolution view of a molecule and its chemical bonds. What’s more, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory researchers got a peek at the molecule as it broke and reformed bonds after undergoing a chemical reaction.
Their images show a molecule, on the left above, which has 26 carbon and 14 hydrogen atoms structured as three connected benzene rings. The molecules on the right are the two most common products that result after the molecule is heated to 90 degrees Celsius.

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Scientists See Chemical Bonds Between Atoms

In an amazing work of microscopy, scientists have gotten a high-resolution view of a molecule and its chemical bonds. What’s more, the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory researchers got a peek at the molecule as it broke and reformed bonds after undergoing a chemical reaction.

Their images show a molecule, on the left above, which has 26 carbon and 14 hydrogen atoms structured as three connected benzene rings. The molecules on the right are the two most common products that result after the molecule is heated to 90 degrees Celsius.

Read More

Oct 19

Blood smear of a patient with Iron deficiency anemia at 40x enhancement

Blood smear of a patient with Iron deficiency anemia at 40x enhancement

Here numerous HIV-1 particles leave a cultured HeLa cell. These viruses lack their vpu gene and thus can’t detach from the cell’s tethering factor, BST2. Each viron particle is ~120nm in diameter. The image was captured with a Zeiss Merlin ultra high-resolution scanning electron microscope. The cells were fixed, dehydrated, critical-point dried, and lightly sputter-coated with gold/palladium.

Here numerous HIV-1 particles leave a cultured HeLa cell. These viruses lack their vpu gene and thus can’t detach from the cell’s tethering factor, BST2. Each viron particle is ~120nm in diameter. The image was captured with a Zeiss Merlin ultra high-resolution scanning electron microscope. The cells were fixed, dehydrated, critical-point dried, and lightly sputter-coated with gold/palladium.

(Source: download.cell.com)

Oct 18

Neurosurgery

Neurosurgery

Oct 17

Mitochondria

Mitochondria

Oct 16

Axial CT image with i.v. contrast. Macrocystic adenocarcinoma of the pancreatic head.

Axial CT image with i.v. contrast. Macrocystic adenocarcinoma of the pancreatic head.

(Source: Wikipedia)

Oct 15

Vintage Illustration of the Human Heart

Vintage Illustration of the Human Heart

Oct 14

The seminiferous tubules (pseudocolored blue in the image to the left) are part of the male reproductive system and are the site of sperm production and development. The majority of the volume of the testis comprises tightly compacted seminiferous tubules, and the total collective length of these tubules in humans can range from 300 to 700 meters.
Image: Spermatids (pink) in seminiferous tubules of mouse testis. Digitally pseudocolored scanning electron microscopy.

The seminiferous tubules (pseudocolored blue in the image to the left) are part of the male reproductive system and are the site of sperm production and development. The majority of the volume of the testis comprises tightly compacted seminiferous tubules, and the total collective length of these tubules in humans can range from 300 to 700 meters.

Image: Spermatids (pink) in seminiferous tubules of mouse testis. Digitally pseudocolored scanning electron microscopy.

(Source: download.cell.com)

Oct 13

“For the first time, and to the astonishment of many of their colleagues, researchers created what they call Alzheimer’s in a Dish — a petri dish with human brain cells that develop the telltale structures of Alzheimer’s disease. In doing so, they resolved a longstanding problem of how to study Alzheimer’s and search for drugs to treat it; the best they had until now were mice that developed an imperfect form of the disease.” — Breakthrough Replicates Human Brain Cells for Use in Alzheimer’s Research - NYTimes.com (via jonathanmarcus)

(via jonathanmarcus)

Proliferative diabetic retinopathy on funduscopic examination is shown here. This is a particularly serious complication in diabetics that can lead to blindness.

Proliferative diabetic retinopathy on funduscopic examination is shown here. This is a particularly serious complication in diabetics that can lead to blindness.

(Source: library.med.utah.edu)

Oct 12

[video]

Oct 11

Panoramic X-Ray

Panoramic X-Ray

Oct 10

Approximately 80% of malignant tumors in the CNS are gliomas, which include morphologically distinct cancers that resemble astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and ependymal cells. Such heterogeneity suggests that glioma originates from multiple cell types. Another possibility, however, is that gliomas arise from mutated neural stem cells (NSCs), which could give rise to a variety of tumors.
Recently, Hui Zong and colleagues address this debate by engineering a “mosaic” mouse with three types of NSCs: mutations in the tumor suppressors p53 and Nf1 (green); wild-type p53 and Nf1 (red); and, heterozygous for both mutations (yellow). All three NSCs give rise to the normal repertoire of neuronal cell types, but only mutant NSCs give rise to oligodendrocyte precursor cells (crescent-shaped cells) that develop into malignant gliomas.
Image: The brain of a “mosaic” glioma model mouse imaged by confocal microscopy at the pre-transforming stage (inset; postnatal day 60) and the early stage (three months) when the tumor started to emerge (white box). Mutant, wild type, and heterozygous cells are labeled as green, red, and yellow, respectively. The green cells with small “crescent” cell bodies are mutant oligodendrocyte precursor cells, the cell of origin for the glioma at the later stage. Scale, 2 cm.

Approximately 80% of malignant tumors in the CNS are gliomas, which include morphologically distinct cancers that resemble astrocytes, oligodendrocytes and ependymal cells. Such heterogeneity suggests that glioma originates from multiple cell types. Another possibility, however, is that gliomas arise from mutated neural stem cells (NSCs), which could give rise to a variety of tumors.

Recently, Hui Zong and colleagues address this debate by engineering a “mosaic” mouse with three types of NSCs: mutations in the tumor suppressors p53 and Nf1 (green); wild-type p53 and Nf1 (red); and, heterozygous for both mutations (yellow). All three NSCs give rise to the normal repertoire of neuronal cell types, but only mutant NSCs give rise to oligodendrocyte precursor cells (crescent-shaped cells) that develop into malignant gliomas.

Image: The brain of a “mosaic” glioma model mouse imaged by confocal microscopy at the pre-transforming stage (inset; postnatal day 60) and the early stage (three months) when the tumor started to emerge (white box). Mutant, wild type, and heterozygous cells are labeled as green, red, and yellow, respectively. The green cells with small “crescent” cell bodies are mutant oligodendrocyte precursor cells, the cell of origin for the glioma at the later stage. Scale, 2 cm.

(Source: download.cell.com)

Oct 09

Human Karyotype

Human Karyotype

(Source: teampub.files.wordpress.com)